A Chaotic Mind

glimpses of the world through the lens of my perception

690 notes

bralef asked: What about wasps? I don't think any insect is as universally hated as the wasp. They're like bees, only bigger assholes in basically every way. But surely they must serve SOME purpose to the ecosystem that would suffer if all wasps were to just mysteriously die...Right?

bogleech:

It’s amazing how often I hear that question honestly…wasps are predators, and predators are essential in maintaining the populations of other organisms so that no one species overcrowds, expends its resources and destroys both itself and the rest of its biome. That kind of goes without saying really.

Of course, with wasps, it goes a little deeper than that, too; while carnivorous, social wasps such as yellow jackets do an amazing job indiscriminately regulating all sorts of insects, the majority of wasps are parasitoids who evolved to kill one and only one host species.

In most cases, a single wasp is in fact the ONLY thing keeping a given species of caterpillar, aphid or other plant-eater from a devastatingly destructive population explosion.

This is a service so deeply integrated in the ecosystem that a staggering amount of plant life, including most of the trees, shrubs and grasses you see every day, have evolved to directly communicate with wasps - and wasps alone - when they’re in danger.

Corn, for example, is attacked by two different corn-specialist caterpillars. Each of those caterpillars has its own enemy wasp. The corn plant will tolerate some small amount of munching, but if it starts to get overwhelmed by caterpillar activity, it will identify which of the two species is feeding on it and release a chemical signal into the air, attracting exactly the right species of wasp.

To top it off, wasps also play just as big a role in flower pollination as bees, with many flowers, especially orchids, even evolving to be pollinated by wasps alone.

Wasps as a whole are basically among the most important land animals on our planet.

As for their “assholeishness,” though, most of that is pure hyperbole. It’s pretty much just a “meme” that wasps are evil, nasty monsters who love to sting people. I’ve never been stung by a wasp in my entire life. Generally, they only sting if they have reason to believe you are a predator after their nest and their young. They pay a lot of attention to how you behave around them, and if you get scared or panicky, all they know is that your level of “excitement” has risen, which, to them, can only mean you’re eager to devour their family.

Filed under wasps

184,361 notes

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said  “Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad) I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.
You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said
“Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad)
I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.

You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

(Source: never-let--it-die, via thedailylaughs)

Filed under oh

4 notes

blacktycoon:

image

Slaved over this picture all last night. Queen Sectonia rocks my socks, so here’s this random-ass fan-form fan-art that I couldn’t scan because our printer isn’t hooked up to any of our computers.

I’m gonna upload this on DevArt in a sec, so if you want to hear me tear into myself for everything I could find that is wrong with this pic (or if you want to hear my stupid fan-lore on why this even exists), check it out on there.

No, I probably won’t color it unless I suddenly acquire photoshop. I tend to ruin everything I touch with any sort of color.

Filed under my siblings folks art fan art

8 notes

i will never understand the urge to bash anyone’s art or work.

i just don’t get it.

i mean, it’s totally fine if we don’t like it.  we’re allowed.  we don’t have to like everything.

and it’s totally fine if we disagree with the way an artist or creator does their work, or how they present issues, or any other aspect.  again, we’re allowed.  we don’t have to like it.  we don’t have to agree with it.  (we don’t even have to agree with it while still appreciating their artistic output. one can recognize that the creator is flawed.)

but there’s a huge difference between “I disagree with the way this person does things, I don’t like their style/direction/commentary” - and even giving reasons for the above (“i think the way they do business is harmful if you look at it this way; i much prefer this kind of sound/look/feel”)

versus

"that’s boring"  "that’s trash, why would anyone like that?"  "how can they justify doing things that way?”  ”they can only do that because they’re so damn privileged”  et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

because even if we think that

and even if we’re justified in thinking that (and who knows? maybe we are.  maybe we’re not.)

there are a couple things I think we’re forgetting.

one, no matter how successful or unsuccessful that particular creator is, they almost certainly worked their ass off to make that piece of work.  to make any of their work.  they almost certainly had a reason to make it in the first place, and a reason to give it to the public.  they wouldn’t do it otherwise.  they poured some of themselves into that work.  most artists and creators I know are willing to consider criticism - “have you thought about this?”  ”what do you think of this angle?”  ”I’m not sure this particular thing works” - but everyone is dragged down by “that’s crap”  ”your way of doing things is shit”  ”you only get attention because of x”.  it’s disheartening.  

two, somewhere out there in the world there is someone who loves that piece of work with all their heart.  there is someone whom that piece of work got them through some shit, maybe even some really tough shit.  I think we can all empathize with that.  i think we all have art - music, visual art, theatre, anything - that has touched us, made us reconsider, changed us, saved us.  and whether or not the person who loves that art, that art that you consider not worth your time and respect, whether or not they recognize whatever problems that work or that creator has -

that’s not the point.

the point is it helped them.  it touched them.  despite whatever problems it/they might have.

so why do we shit on that?

why do we think it’s okay to shit on anyone’s work?

because there will be someone who will read what we’ve written

about this piece of work not being worth our time

about it being useless and boring and problematic

and they will think to themselves

"is something wrong with me, for liking this?  is there something wrong with me, that this helped me?"

yes, artists need feedback and criticism.  so does everyone.  it pushes us forward, makes us reconsider our views, expands our horizons.  that’s fine.  again, we don’t have to like everything, we certainly don’t have to agree with everything, and we are totally free to talk about that, and we should.  but thoughtless nastiness is not criticism.

that work pulled someone away from the brink.

that artist put their life and their time into sending a message.

can we engage in critical discussion while respecting those intentions and effects?

i think we can.

Filed under art thoughts problematic art problematic creators criticism discussion personal note: this is making me super nervous to post sigh thanks anxiety long post

2 notes

blacktycoon:

Weeping Angel around a corner:

-Wouldn’t come into view and then stop— you’d see it move, no matter how little

-Wouldn’t turn to stone while still behind the corner— you can’t see it

So what, does it just run in circles and hope you don’t walk around the corner

Filed under woh. weeping angels i feel like if you were walking and it was moving towards the corner there would be a split second where it would begin to come into view and it would stop but the idea of a weeping angel going in circles is very funny

4 notes

hey so I love bees

bees are awesome

but that post that’s going around about how they’re dying off too fast

if you actually click through - not just to the article, but to the actual research findings

you will find the researchers have not stated that in so many words just yet.  in fact, they haven’t even published their final report (it’s due in Jan 2015)

so

yes we need to save the bees they are dying too much

and yes neonicotinoids are a very bad thing and we shouldn’t be using them (the Harvard study linked to in the article is quite serious about that)

but we’re not on the brink of extinction quite yet (as far as I can tell)

because they’re not linked to in the post:

Filed under bees checking sources if you've got other sources let me know